Posts Tagged "New"

Purple beech

Fagus sylvatica ‘Purpurea’ – purple beeches are used to steel the show. They are planted as solitary trees in big parks or stately gardens.

Most trees are green, but many also have purple red variants. Examples are plum, maple, beech and the very popular red Japanese maple. Most of these genetic variations are quite rare in nature, but people love rare things and so we started propagating these trees. A single purple beech tree that was found in Germany over 300 years ago is believed to be the ancestor of the majority of trees now planted in parks and gardens.

European Hornbeam

Carpinus Betulus – hornbeam stands out with its abundance of winged fruit. The bright green color contrasts with the darker green of the sharply detailed leaves.

Small-leaved linden

Tilia cordata – an elegant species of linden tree, with much smaller leaves. With only one third the size of a regular linden leaf, it gives this tree a very fine appearance, in contrast to the bold character of common linden.

Narrow-leaved ash

Fraxinus angustifolia – narrow-leaved ash is closely related to olive. The feathery appearance makes it an airy tree that feels distinctly Mediterranean, and this is where it mostly grows naturally.

European beech

Fagus sylvatica – a majestic forest tree. Impressive branches fluently branch into broad fans of leaves. Beech trees are often used as ornamental trees in parks and large gardens. They form extremely lush, impressive crowns.

Black tupelo

Nyssa sylvatica – black tupelo is related to holly and it shares the glossy leaves, but without the prickly spikes. This gives it a much more friendly appearance.

Robinia

Robinia – a cascading waterfall of tiny leaflets, this tree from the pea family is something else completely, and adds to the diversity of trees in temperate climates.

Yellow buckeye

Aesculus flava – a North American relative to the horse chestnut, with large palmately compound leaves. A bold tree with bold leaves and bold fruit.

Ginkgo

Ginkgo biloba – a living fossil and the only remaining species in a ancient family of trees dating back hundreds of millions of years.

Spaeth alder

Alnus X spaethii ‘Spaeth’ – a strong and fast growing tree. Its main feature are the long, dark green leaves that have a nice shine to them. Even better, these leaves stay green for a long time in fall.

Sweet Chestnut

Castanea sativa – a proud member of the beech family. It produces the well-known chestnuts, an edible fruit. Sweet chestnut trees have attractive dark green foliage clustered into pointy fans.